Posts by Cpt.Slow

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    Nice idea to do poll about that ?
    I'm curious what all the favourites are.


    Feel free to also tell the reason for your choice. ;)


    I've choosen the 3rd Gen LC cause of the modern look and new Optiview mirrors ?



    EDIT: You can now also vote on Discord ?

    is there a way to implement AA method with a more clear overall image?

    The method is called "Set AA to low and increase the resulution scale to sth. between 100 - 200"
    I don't know even one UE4 game where AA doen't mess up everything. Don't know what everyone or Epic is doing wrong here.

    Regarding to your D-Pad question. Isn't this already ingame since launch?

    I've disabled it immediately cause for me it's pointless but you could be right, that you might be very limeted in terms of funcions there.
    Atm. there is no way around a keyboard ?. Probably it will change in the future since TML is going to concentrate on consoles, too with the DMD-project.

    Just a quick reminder for those who haven't made it to the Discord server yet.
    Feel free to join and help to populate it. It is a great addition to the forum and you wont miss any important information even if you aren't checking the forums on daily basis. ?

    Quick DeepL Translation:


    Erfurt. The computer game developers of TML grew up with simulators. Now they want to use a federal grant to conquer the console market with Dead Man's Diary.

    Thomas Michael Langelotz stands in an office of the TML-Studios. The graphic designers work on new computer games.


    In an office on Erfurt's Haarbergstraße, TML employee Daniel is building houses for Berlin on his computer. Eric sets a Dutch village in a landscape of dunes, and Attila divides the world into sections so that the traffic in the long-distance bus simulator can flow smoothly.


    In front of the fourth computer sits the dead man with his diary. He walks through a fantasy world of dilapidated huts, unpaved paths and lots of overturned oil barrels.


    These are the first scenes from "Dead Man's Diary". The survival adventure of the Erfurt based TML Studios has just received 200,000 Euros from the German government's computer game funding and is scheduled to be released by the end of next year.

    Langelotz started small, but not in a garage


    The game developers around company founder Thomas Langelotz are breaking new ground several times with "DMD", as "Dead Man's Diary" is called for short. It is the first adventure computer game from the first-person perspective, and above all the first game to be developed for Playstation and Xbox.


    "This is a very important project for us," says Langelotz. "We want to bring our simulations to the consoles and start with something smaller first".


    Thomas Langelotz also started out small. His initials and middle name Michael were used to create the company name TML. The former Disc Jockey began in 2004 in his apartment to develop add-on software for existing games. He did not have a garage, which is the beginning of many software legends from the American Silicon Valley.

    At first a subway ran through Berlin


    The first success was a subway simulator for Berlin, which TML Studios developed from the train simulator of Microsoft. The apartment had already become too small, but two offices on Haarbergstraße were sufficient at that time. Today there are several rooms, 15 programmers and graphic designers and some freelancers.


    Driving simulators are still the core products of the Erfurt game company. They appeal to a very special fan community. "As a child, many people dream of driving a bus or subway later," says Langelotz.


    In addition, there is the calming effect: While other computer games drive the adrenalin through the veins, the realistic driving of long-distance bus lines with computer mouse and arrow keys has a calming effect. Two thirds of the customers live abroad, many in China or Turkey. They are interested in both Europe and technology.

    Over 200,000 Flixbus simulators have been sold


    The company's flagship product is the remote bus simulator, for which the company Flixbus issued the official license. A plaque in the TML consulting room shows that 200,000 units have already been sold. The user can also drive through Erfurt and over the Rennsteig.


    The Tourist Bus Simulator for Fuerteventura is also successful. The city bus simulator for Berlin, "The Bus", is scheduled to be released in early 2021.


    All these games require an immense amount of effort. The users attach importance to authentic vehicles with authentic behavior and a real-looking environment. To achieve this, the developers recreate entire worlds in the computer, in which the rest of the traffic should also flow naturally.

    Even non-players follow the two radio stations


    Not every single building and shrub is depicted one-to-one. "It's all about conveying the atmosphere of a city," says Langelotz. In Erfurt, this naturally includes views of the cathedral.


    In the TML remote bus, the user can even listen to the radio. Langelotz also operates two Internet radio stations, "Double Bass fm," and "Flash Bass fm". The two stations, of which "Flash" even offers a live show with the former DJ on Friday evenings, have become independent and are also heard by non-players.


    For TML, "DMD" is not the first excursion into the world of virtual adventure beyond simulations. The beginning was made in 2007 with "Sunrise" ("Sunrise"). Three boys accidentally beamed into a deserted New York City and had to find their way back from the dangerous parallel world. Problems with distribution prevented the game from taking off.

    New game acts in a world after a nuclear war


    The "Diary of the Dead" deals with a posthumous world. The player is one of the surviving bunker inhabitants, who has to solve puzzles, crack codes, find clues and thus bring about a rescue in the contaminated world. "A happy end is possible," promises Thomas Langelotz.


    There is no shooting with "DMD". Langelotz believes that computer games are exciting even without weapons, and refers instead to the thorough research on the subject of radioactivity, for example, which is intended to make the game credible in scientific detail.


    The 200,000 euros cover about half of the estimated development costs. The Federal Ministry of Transportation had first launched the computer game funding and was overrun by applications.

    Germany lags behind in games development


    "With Gamescom, Germany has the largest games fair in the world, but we also have the Red Lantern in games development," says Langelotz. "Germany has missed the starting signal for games promotion by 20 years. The market for computer games has long since overtaken the cinema in terms of size, but in Germany or even Thuringia this has not yet arrived.


    In the medium term, Langelotz plans to also offer driving simulations for consoles. "The games scream for it," he says. But since they are far more complex than adventures in virtual worlds, "DMD" is ideal for first familiarizing oneself with the requirements of the consoles.


    Translated with http://www.DeepL.com/Translator (free version)